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The One Ingredient That Improves Brain Function

Has your immunity been on the lower end of the health scale lately? Is your libido lacking? Does your skin look dull? If you answered yes to all or most of these questions, then we have the remedy. Or at least Amanda Chantal Bacon does. The founder of the hip Los Angeles–based juice and wellness bar Moon Juice is renowned for her tinctures, powders, and drinks that harness the powerful healing properties of adaptogenic herbs, raw foods, and alkalizing ingredients. These potent formulations boast a multitude of health benefits from improving brain function to increasing sex drive. This isn’t just another health and wellness trend either. Bacon’s formulas draw on ancient herbs and roots known throughout time for their potent medicinal value, all of which she has experienced firsthand. “Food can be powerful medicine, and no one has experienced its effects more dramatically than I have,” she told MyDomaine. “Before I began to cook and eat in a way that allowed me to thrive cosmically, my thyroid was slow, allergies were rampant, and I had the general feeling that I wasn’t optimizing this life and the body I was traveling in. There’s nothing I love more than talking to people about the ways that they can use food as medicine.” But if you can’t get into her store, then Bacon shows you how to make them yourself at home with her new wellness tome, The Moon Juice Cookbook review. Ahead, Bacon explains how to incorporate them into our daily lives, the one ingredient that improves brain health, and how to relieve stress naturally. Be sure to scroll to the end for her exclusive Deep Chocolate Moon Milk recipe.

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Why Does the Top Crust Separate from my Pound Cake?

Wanda asks: I have used a pound cake recipe, handed down from my grandmother, for years without any problems.  Lately the crust has separated and crumbled from the rest of the cake.  I use 6 egg whites that are whipped to soft peaks, then folded into the cake batter.  I initially thought that I was not completely folding in the whites and that was the cause.  But I folded them in more without any difference in the results.  The only other ingredients are sifted flour, sugar, egg yolks, baking soda and sour cream.  Please help and tell me what I could be doing wrong. Baking S.O.S. says: It is always frustrating when a trusted recipe starts having problems when it was never a problem before.  It becomes a complete mystery to try to figure out what changed! I noticed in your ingredient list that you did not mention butter.  Typically, why does my pound cake crack on top is supposed to call for a pound of flour, a pound of sugar, a pound of eggs, and a pound of butter–hence the name “pound cake.”

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Sous Vide: A Simple and Stress-Free Way to Reheat Almost Anything

From favorite pans to tried-and-true microwave and toaster oven settings, we all have our go-to tricks for reviving yesterday’s steak, using up leftover leg of lamb, or enjoying that juicy chicken breast one last time. Those working for you? Great—use them! But if you’re in the market for a no-fuss reheating method that eliminates the risk of overcooking, then please allow sous vide to blow your leftovers-loving mind. As discussed ad nauseam all over this here site, sous vide means bringing food to the optimal temperature at which you want to cook it—never hotter. So when you reheat it to around that same temperature, you’re not overcooking it and drying it out. Oh no. What you are doing is returning that food to its best self so it can live its truth inside your belly. What’s more, you can leave said food ’til you need it—a total lifesaver when white-knuckling your way through a multipart meal. In the FAQ below, find all the things you need to know about reheating foods with sous vide. Then use it to create and re-create all your favorite foods, again and again and again and again (and—what the hell—again). Why is sous vide so great for reheating? First off, let’s talk about traditional reheating methods. These do more than just heat up leftover food; they also recook it. Take a chilled, two-inch-thick, bone-in steak. To warm that bad boy back up, you’ll need to best way to reheat steak it for about the same amount of time it took to cook. Throw an already cooked steak in a hot pan for 40 minutes, and you’ll wind up with a dried-out crust and a maybe-still-not-hot center. Bummer, right?

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